Economic costs of Heart Failure set to Sky Rocket For help with Heart Failure call 0800 9788133

The journal “Circulation” has published today that the number of Americans with heart failure could rise 46%, from 5 million in 2012 to 8 million in 2030, new research says. This should be awake call for the UK considering similar public health profiles.

Also potentially the direct and indirect costs of treating the condition could more than double, from $31 billion to $70 billion, over the same time period.

This means that by 2030, every U.S. taxpayer could be paying $244 a year to care for heart failure patients, according to the American Heart Association policy statement. It said the findings highlight the need for strategies to prevent and treat heart failure.

Heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalisation for Americans over age 65. The rising number of people with heart failure is the result of an aging population and an increase in the rates of conditions that contribute to heart failure, such as high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease.

“If we don’t improve or reduce the incidence of heart failure by preventing and treating the underlying conditions, there will be a large monetary and health burden on the country,” said Dr. Paul Heidenreich in an American Heart Association news release. “The costs will be paid for by every adult, not just every adult with heart failure.”

“Awareness of risk factors and adequately treating them is the greatest need,” said Heidenreich, a professor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine and director of a chronic heart failure research initiative at the VA Health Care System in Palo Alto, Calif.

The statement includes recommendations on how to tackle the issue. These include the following:

  • More effective distribution and use of therapy recommended in guidelines to prevent heart failure and improve patient survival.
  • Improving the coordination of care when hospitalised patients go home in order to help them achieve better outcomes and reduce their risk of having to return to the hospital.
  • Specialised training for physicians, nurses, pharmacists and other health care professionals on advanced heart failure care.
  • Improving heart failure prevention and care for minority groups and lower-income people.
  • Increasing access to palliative and hospice care for patients with heart failure in advanced stages.

The statement was published online April 24 in the journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Share

Tags: , , , , ,

You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.